Technology in the Doll World- DIY 3D Printed Dolls

This past month, my mom and I decided to really use our 3D printer to the best of its abilities– to 3D print some ball jointed dolls! Found on the popular 3D printing site Thingiverse, these projects turned out to be winners!

3D Printed Dolls

The first project we decided to print was Froggy. Froggy was designed by an artist named Loubie. I am estimating it took me 26 or so hours to complete this print. I didn’t start keeping track of the hours each piece took until Robotica, who you’ll see next! Unlike the other two projects you’ll see, Froggy took some gluing before he was able to be strung.  My favorite parts of him are his huge frog feet and his fantastically sculpted/designed face. Froggy was printed in green Dremel brand PLA filament. He wasn’t the simplest thing to string, but eventually we got him together.

3D Printed Frog

3D Printed Frog

3D Printed Frog

The second project we printed also took around 26 hours to complete and is pretty awesome! Meet Robotica. She’s the creation of doll artist Shira (aka Sonja Verdu). Shira made an amazing sculpt/design for Robotica, which includes a cool panel like skin, a well defined bust/torso and some pretty awesome leg pieces. Robotica has a headcap, which allows you to do whatever you want with the eye area. My Robotica is currently using dark blue beads as eyes. She was printed with InLand temperature sensitive PLA. In cold temps, she’ll turn dark blue and in warmer temps, she’ll turn white-ish! For some reason, as you will see in the pictures below, she photographs purple in low light.

Robotica, 3D Printed BJD

Because I strung her legs poorly, she won’t stand, but if someone who was a master at stringing worked on her, I bet she’d be really great at standing. I’m not going to worry about it for now, though, because she looks fine sitting and her arms and head are strung tight enough for me to pose her upper body. Robotica’s hands move forward and backward. Her wrists were supposed to turn, but my printer fused these pieces together.

Robotica, 3D printed BJD

3D Print: Robotica

3D Print: Robotica

The last project we tried was also designed by Shira. This time, we printed her smaller Jointed Robot. My mom requested him. He took about 9 hours to print and was a terror to string (those darn arms), but we managed it eventually! I love how the robot turned out, myself. The print, especially his face, is adorable. I think I may try to print this guy larger one of these days. (The same goes for Robotica. There was a company that printed her human size and the results look pretty cool!) If you do decide to print this Jointed Robot, you may run into issues with his fingers. I printed the hand, which included three fingers, multiple times and each time I did, the fingers, made to move independently, would break (or fall off). In the end, we had to glue these fingers into place.

3D Printed Robot

3D Printed Robot

3D Printed Robot

Now, you may be thinking, ‘I don’t have a 3D printer, so I can never make these.’ Wrong. Many libraries nowadays are buying 3d printers and things for their patrons to use, so there’s a good chance that if you’re determined and okay with making several trips to, for example, your library, you can actually print one of these for your own collection! (Many schools are buying 3D printers, too, so if you’re a student, you may have access to one!) On top of that, there are sites that will actually print STL files for you and then ship you the results. Shapeways offers this service, but I’m sure there are also many other sites around that might be able to do this for you.  It may be a little more costly then finding a local haunt with a rentable 3D printer, but it’s an option!

3D Print: Robotica

The number of projects on the internet for BJD’s like these are slim at the moment, but I hope more artists try their hand at making 3D printable dolls for us to enjoy! This whole thing makes me think about Makies, the 3D printed doll company that closed up shop early this year. (Find real printable Makies files on Thingiverse here!) Wouldn’t it have been interesting if they had evolved into something that was more ‘do it yourself’, rather than doing all the printing in house? If they had created files that were easy to print and modify for users to print on their own printers, saving them the cost of all that filament? (Sure they wouldn’t be as pretty or well constructed, but if printing these three dolls taught me anything, it’s that it’s so cool being able to say you printed your own BJD!) It’s an interesting thought.

So, I’ll leave you with this question. With 3D printers making their way from industrial plants into homes, how do you see them affecting the doll market? Do you plan on trying your hand at printing your own BJD or even designing your own? (I’m not talented enough to do that, so if you are, why not try!) Let me know in the comment area!

May 27, 2016. Tags: . Uncategorized. 9 comments.

Made To Move Barbie and Pullips

If you’re like me, you’ve dabbled in replacing your Pullip‘s stock body with an obitsu body. You’ve probably also wanted to rip your hair out, because of the crazy wobbly head (and/or torso) some Pullips have once you do re-body them. There are other options, like Liv bodies, but they’re not very easy to come by these days.  Now, there’s an option you can find in your local retail store!  Pullip communities over the internet have been buzzing over Mattel‘s new Made To Move Barbie line. The Made To Move line is basic in look and outfit, but offers more articulation than ever before, even double jointed knees and elbows.

Made to Move Barbie

The Barbie herself is a bit plain. She has a pretty, clean face. Her workout outfit includes black leggings and a stretchy short sleeve top that is bright pink and blue. Her joints are on full display in the box, where she sits in a yoga-esc position.

Now, I have to admit, I didn’t buy this Barbie for the actual doll. I only bought her for her body! If there’s any way to get my Pullips into better, less wobbly bodies, I am willing to try! After taking out the insanely long neck knob (which I neglected to take a photo off, but rest assured, it’s over-kill for sure), it was relatively simple to tweak it into something Pullip friendly. Usually, I’m sanding for hours, but, in this case, it took less than 30 minutes. Here’s the result of my little experiment.

Made to Move Barbie on Pullip

I love the proportions of the Made To Move body way more than the obitsu’s, to be quite honest. The size of obitsu’s can be odd sometimes and most of what I dress my Pullips in are Barbie clothes anyways! Using this kind of body might help the clothing fit better! And better still, the head isn’t wobbly! It actually fits really sturdily on the body and doesn’t pull back on the torso joint, either!

Made to Move Barbie on Pullip

Video Tutorial Here:

The color matching isn’t perfect, but I’ll take it! Have you tried to switch out your Pullip stock bodies or obitsu bodies with a Made To Move Barbie body? What do you think of this easy to find replacement body? Share your thoughts in the comment area!

January 3, 2016. Tags: . Uncategorized. 23 comments.

Dolly ReRoot: Little Miss No Name

One more post for 2015! My mother asked me to work on yet another Little Miss No Name re-root. I love working on LMNN’s, so I was happy to comply. (Check out my other LMNN posts here.)

Usually, my mom likes her LMNN’s to have blonde or brunette tones. For this re-root, she went in a different direction and chose a very different sort of color! This LMNN ended up with a wicked shade of Ultraviolet nylon hair. Ultraviolet is a warm grape tone and looks super cool.

Little Miss No Name ReRoot

This LMNN had a cut in her foot, which is why she’s currently wearing the large orange socks.

Little Miss No Name ReRoot

Little Miss No Name ReRoot

Little Miss No Name ReRoot

I believe I used 4-5 hanks on this girl, but I have to admit, I totally forgot to keep track– again. Both my mom and I agree that this hair calls for a groovy, hippy sort of outfit, which we’ll find for her eventually.

Happy New Year!

One of my resolutions for the new year is to do one re-root a month. I feel like I have 5,000 dolls sitting in my room waiting for new hair, so it’s about time I worked on them. And with that, I’ll leave you until 2016! Have a safe and happy new year!

December 31, 2015. Tags: . Uncategorized. 4 comments.

Dolly Re-Root: Ideal Giggles

At the last Chicago Doll and Toy Show at the Kane County Fairgrounds, I picked up an Ideal Giggles.  I had rerooted a Giggles in the past for my mom and decided it was time to purchase my own. This Giggles was a steal at $15.00. Giggles had very dry hair and was in desperate need of a reroot when I picked her up.

Giggles

Giggles-Before

I knew that Giggles needed a fun and funky hair color, so after much debating on Dollyhair, I decided to order 5 hanks of nylon Dragonfly.  Dragonfly is a vibrant green that reflects a blue tint when in the sun. It’s a very cool color. There’s so much depth to it. I love it!

Re-root in progress

Re-root in progress

After a day and a half of rooting and 3 hanks of hair (long Barbie length), Giggles was complete. Her dull dirty blonde hair was gone, replaced with a wicked cool shade of green. Unlike other dolly reroots, I actually ordered more than enough hanks of hair this time around, which means I have two full hanks to play with on other dolls.

Re-Root: Giggles

Re-Root: Giggles

Re-Root: Giggles

Re-Root: Giggles

Re-Root: Giggles

I’m in love with how this Giggles turned out. (Now, all she needs is a new outfit!) Her green hair gives her tons of spunk!  Have you rerooted something recently? How’d it turn out? Have any thoughts on Giggles transformation? Leave a comment below.

July 31, 2015. Tags: . Uncategorized. 10 comments.

Dolly Re-Root: Little Miss No Name

Last week, I finished a new re-root. Surprise, surprise, it’s a Little Miss No Name!  While not in horrible shape, this particular Little Miss No Name had very dry hair.

Before

Before (Actual before shot disappeared, so but this is close!)

For her re-root, I used nylon Carrot Cake.  Carrot Cake is a very strange color.  Dollyhair describes it as, “More muted than pumpkin spice, but it is still an auburn color. It is more red than amaretto.”  The thing I love about Carrot Cake is that it seems to change color in different lights.  It’s redder than it looks in these photos and sometimes has a bit of a muted pink hue to it.

After

After

After

After

This Little Miss No Name received a shorter do than the usual.  I think it looks great!  Have you re-rooted any dolls recently? Share your thoughts below!

February 2, 2015. Tags: . Uncategorized. 16 comments.

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