Skipper Highlight Reel: Skipper’s Boyfriend Scott

Last time on the Skipper Highlight Reel, we covered Growing Up Skipper and her friend Ginger. This controversial line lead to the sudden disappearance of Skipper for a short period of time. Between 1975 and 1979, most Skipper releases were exclusive to the European market, like Deluxe Quick Curl Skipper and Funtime Skipper. It looks like a Malibu or two was released, but there wasn’t much more than that in the States, according to the internet. (Price guides like the Skipper: Barbie’s Little Sister stop at 1978. I’ve always played with the idea about trying to pitch a book that covers Skipper post 1978. It would be so helpful!)

In 1979, Skipper returned revitalized with a new ‘Super Teen Skipper‘ face mold and more active tagline. Super Teen Skipper was marketed as, “Glamorous one minute, a super sport the next.” Besides the new face, Super Teen Skipper’s body mold was changed from flat chested to having a small bust. To be 100% honest, the Super Teen Skipper is my least favorite of the Skipper’s manufactured. Personally, I find it to be just plain ugly. There’s not one thing that bugs me, it’s pretty much everything about her face that does.

In addition to tweaking Skipper’s sculpt and body, in 1980, she found herself her first ever boyfriend! Scott is an interesting character and definitely reflects the late 70’s/early 80’s! He has a head of curly hair and wears a sporty outfit with a tank top, jacket and pants. To complete the look? Four wheeled roller skates. Just imagine the folks in the skating movies of that time, like Xanadu, and you have Scott.

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Interestingly enough, I always assumed that Scott’s body mold, which has one bent arm and one straight, had to do with the ‘active and sporty’ theme that surrounds him and Super Teen Skipper. Apparently, though, his body mold was also used earlier in 1978 for Mattel’s Jimmy Osmond doll. Those dolls were packaged with microphones and had bent arms so kids could pretend Jimmy was performing. So that’s why Scott has a bent arm.

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Scott has a unique face mold that I don’t think has been used since this release, which only seems to have been produced for a year before disappearing. The whole Super Teen Skipper theme only lasted a few years (thank goodness) with a new face mold for Skipper being released in 1985 and then again in 1988.

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Video review below!

Do you have Scott? What do you think of him? Share your thoughts in the comment area.

February 23, 2017. Tags: , , . Introductions & Reviews, Uncategorized. 9 comments.

Skipper Highlight Reel: Growing Up Skipper and Ginger

It’s time again for another Skipper Highlight Reel! You’ll be seeing more of these as this year continues. With Christmas on the way, I can’t buy many new dolls for myself! It’s far cheaper to highlight things I already own.

Growing up Skipper

This Skipper Highlight Reel is covering one of the more controversial Skipper releases, 1975’s Growing Up Skipper. Growing Up Skipper is a doll with a gimmick. Her box read, “Make her grow from a young girl to a teenager in seconds”. How, you ask? Well, by cracking her left arm in either a clockwise or counter-clockwise fashion! You turn her arm counter-clockwise to make Skipper “grow slim, tall and curvy” and clockwise to make her “cute and young again”.  (Quotes taken directly from the packaging.) Essentially what happens is when you turn Skipper’s arm counter clockwise, her torso grows in length and her bust grows slightly. Doing the reverse, will pull her torso down and make the bust disappear. (Watch the video review where I show this on a nude doll if you’re confused.)

Growing Up Skipper came with two different hair colors, pale blonde and strawberry blonde. Of the strawberry blonde dolls, there are two different hair styles. One release had long, shaggy layers in her hair, while another had a slightly shorter, more tame cut. The difference is slight, but noticeable if the two dolls are close together.

Growing Up Skipper

Above: Shaggy Strawberry Blonde, Pale Blonde, Shorter Cut Strawberry Blonde

Growing Up Skipper

Above: Pale Blonde, Shorter Cut Strawberry Blonde, Shaggy Strawberry Blonde

In 1976, Skipper made friends with Ginger. Ginger was only released in this Growing Up Skipper line. Ginger used the same face mold and body type as Skipper. My Ginger is not in her original outfit. Ginger’s original outfit was similar to Skipper’s, but had a teal color scheme. Her skirt is currently on one of my Skippers. (In case you’re wondering, my Ginger is wearing the Fun at McDonalds Fantasy Fashion.)

Growing Up Skipper

Of the two dolls, I think Ginger is the cutest. The brown hair and eyes  look much cuter on this face mold than Skipper’s strangely painted face.  It’s hard to tell from the grainy commercial above, but the prototype Skipper looks much cuter than what was on store shelves.

Growing Up Skipper

Because Skipper and Ginger grew in length when they changed from being a child to an adult, Mattel included a lot of accessories with this doll. You got a red unitard top, a long red and white skirt, short red and white skirt, white sandles, red flats and a scarf. My dolls aren’t mint and are missing certain pieces. Mattel released a handful of outfit sets for these dolls over the three years, as well.

Growing Up Skipper

Above: “Teenager” Skipper, “Child” Skipper

Do you remember Growing Up Skipper and Ginger? What do you think of these two unique dolls? Share your thoughts below!

September 16, 2016. Tags: , , . Introductions & Reviews, Uncategorized. 12 comments.

Skipper Hightlight Reel: Flying Wendy (1993)

Back when I had a PO Box for those that wanted to reach out via snail mail, I received a naked Flying Wendy doll from a reader/viewer. Thanks to a lucky find, Wendy now has an outfit! She was released back in 1993 when Mattel would use the Skipper face molds for some of the Disney Store exclusives and was released in conjunction with a Tinkerbell and Peter Pan. Like Flying Wendy, the Tink also used a Skipper mold.

Flying Wendy (Disney Exclusive)

Flying Wendy (Disney Exclusive)

Flying Wendy is unique when compared to Skipper dolls, because of her wavy light brown hair and blue eyes. I think she has a very pretty face! Her body is the same you’d see from any other Skipper doll released in the early 90’s. Flying Wendy is a great example of the other characters this face mold can play.

Flying Wendy (Disney Exclusive)

Flying Wendy (Disney Exclusive)

In 1997, Disney released another Peter Pan set, which featured another Skipper mold, the Teen Skipper mold that was used after this large anime eye face.

Flying Wendy (Disney Exclusive)

Both this set and the 1997 set go for some pretty high prices on eBay and would be great additions to any Skipper collection! Do you own this doll? What do you think of her? Share your thoughts in the comment area.

September 1, 2016. Tags: , , , . Introductions & Reviews, Uncategorized. 4 comments.

Skipper Highlight Reel: Living Fluff and Pose ‘N Play Tiff

The last few Skipper Highlight Reel posts have been about doll cases, so I thought I’d break it up a bit with this installment and talk about two of Skipper‘s lesser known best friends. We’ll start with Living Fluff. Making her debut in 1971, Fluff was the first new Skipper friend since Skooter and Ricky were discontinued in 1967.

Living Fluff (1971-1972)

Fluff’s blonde hair is styled in two pigtails with curly bangs/fringe. She has a Living Skipper body, which when compared to previous bodies is more articulated. The ‘Living’ body is prone to melting, especially around the shoulders and hips. My Fluff, for example, has some pretty annoying melt marks around both shoulders and hips. Thankfully, they don’t hurt the arm movement. Fluff’s colorful swimsuit doesn’t help much, leaving little room for her shoulder and hip joints to breathe.

Living Fluff (1971-1972)

One of my favorite things about Fluff is her adorable face with ‘real’ eyelashes. I love Fluff’s long thin smile and round brown eyes. For reasons unknown to me, Fluff was only on the market for one year. She was available as a single doll and in a Sears exclusive Sunshine Special gift set. The exclusive included Fluff (in her traditional yellow swimsuit) and two hip outfits.

Living Fluff (1971-1972)

As 1972 rolled around, Fluff made a quick exit and was replaced with Pose ‘n Play Tiff. Tiff, described as Skipper’s ‘tom boy’ friend, was the best pal of Pose ‘n Play Skipper. She shares the same body and face mold as Fluff, not to mention the depressingly short release window.

Pose 'n Play Tiff (1972-1973)

Unlike Fluff, Tiff has painted lashes and straight brown hair. Playing on the tom boy theme, Tiff (in her original outfit, not the one pictured above) wears a white tank top and jeans with decals that read ‘Stop’, ‘Help’ and ‘Go’. Her accessory of choice? A skateboard.

Pose 'n Play Tiff (1972-1973)

By 1973, Tiff disappeared. Nowadays, she’s one of the rarer Skipper dolls to find, especially with her original outfit and/or mint in box. Both Fluff and Tiff may not have lasted long in the line when compared with friends Skooter and Courtney, but they definitely made an impact with their adorable face mold and interesting looks!

Pose 'n Play Tiff/Skipper and Living Fluff

Do you remember Fluff or Tiff? Do you have one in your collection? Share your thoughts on these two in the comment area!

August 16, 2016. Tags: , , . Introductions & Reviews, Uncategorized. 5 comments.

Collection Close Up: Skipper/Skooter Beach Case (1965)

Recently, I acquired one of my favorite Skipper doll cases. Made in 1965 by Standard Plastic Products, this case features Skipper and her friend Skooter running on the beach. This case was released in blue and yellow vinyl. (A single doll case was also created, it seems, using this graphic. After doing some googling, I found an image of that one, too!)

Skipper/Skooter Doll Case (1965)

Since it’s a double case, there’s lots of room to store your dolls and clothing inside! The graphics are fantastic, as is expected with these vintage cases. The way the artist captured Skipper and Skooter is right on and very artfully done. Some cases feature Skipper in a more passive pose, but this particular case has a far more interesting graphic. I love cases that have ‘action packed’ poses, like this one!

Skipper/Skooter Doll Case (1965)

Do you own this case? Have you recently picked up a cool vintage case? Share your thoughts in the comment area.

July 30, 2016. Tags: , . Introductions & Reviews, Uncategorized. 4 comments.

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